Wednesday, December 05, 2018

Detecting and Mapping Slums using Open Data

Urban and slum areas in Nairobi (False composite image created
by stacking image bands 7, 6 and 4 from the Landsat 8 satellite.
Turning back to slums, we just published paper entitled "Detecting and Mapping Slums using Open Data: A Case Study in Kenya" in the International Journal of Digital Earth. This work builds and extends our previous research on using new sources of data to explore the slum settlements in 3 cities in Kenya (i.e. Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu).  Specifically, we examine how the fusion of Volunteered Geographical Information, Social Media, and other open data sources can complement remote sensing imagery in supporting slum detection, mapping and monitoring. 

We do this by using data mining tools (e.g. logistic regression, discriminant analysis and the See5 decision tree), to develop context-sensitive definitions for slums based on location, as well as for testing the generalizability of indicators and derived slum models. The end result is an indicator database for slums using open sources of physical and socio-economic data that can be used to characterize slum settlements. If you wish to know more, below we provide the abstract to the paper along with some of the figures and the full citation with a link to the paper itself.

Abstract:
The worldwide slum population currently stands at over one billion, with substantial growth expected in the coming decades. Traditionally, slums have been mapped using information derived mainly from either physical indicators using remote sensing data, or socio-economic indicators using census data. Each data source on its own provides only a partial view of slums, an issue further compounded by data poverty in less developed countries. To overcome such issues, this paper explores the fusion of traditional with emerging open data sources and data mining tools to identify additional indicators that can be used to detect and map the presence of slums, map their footprint, and map their evolution. Towards this goal, we develop an indicator database for slums using open sources of physical and socio-economic data that can be used to characterize slum settlements. Using this database, we then leverage data mining techniques to identify the most suitable combination of these indicators for mapping slums. Using three cities in Kenya as test cases, results show that the fusion of these data can improve the mapping accuracy of slums. These results suggest that the proposed approach can provide a viable solution to the emerging challenge of monitoring the growth of slums.
Keywords: Slums; Remote Sensing; Socio-economic; Urban sustainability; Data mining; Kenya

Study areas in Kenya

Methodology workflow

Distribution of positive classified cases for slums for (a) logistic regression, (b) discriminant analysis and (c) the See5 decision tree.
Full Reference:
Mahabir, R., Agouris, P., Stefanidis, A., Croitoru, A. and Crooks, A.T. (2018), Detecting and Mapping Slums using Open Data: A Case Study in Kenya, International Journal of Digital Earth. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17538947.2018.1554010. (pdf)

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